Henry Moore Foundation

Hugh Broughton Architects, Perry Green, 2017

 

Subscribe now to instantly view this image

Subscribe to the Architects’ Journal (AJ) for instant access to the AJ Buildings Library, an online database of nearly 2,000 exemplar buildings in photographs, plans, elevations and details.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

The cantilevered single-storey roof flips back over the top in an angled curve to add office space in one of the original buildings 

Hufton + Crow     Download Original

  • The cantilevered single-storey roof flips back over the top in an angled curve to add office space in one of the original buildings    
  • The building was designed to sit in the surrounding environment, not on it    
  • The visitor centre and archive at Henry Moore Studios and Gardens is the second project Hugh Broughton Architects (HBA) has designed for the Henry Moore Foundation    
  • The archive is contained within an original house which has been fully repurposed     
  • The roof lets in a high degree of natural light    
  • The foundation provides safe storage for Moore’s films, negatives, prints, papers and books    
  • Clean, simple lines were important in the design    
  • The buildings reflect the legacy of one of Britain    
  • The new archive, with a blockwork and concrete plank structure, contains three BS 5454-compliant controlled-environment spaces    
  • Site plan    
  • Archive ground floor plan    
  • Archive entrance elevation    
  • Archive side elevation    
  • Visitor centre first floor plan    
  • Visitor centre section AA    
  • Visitor centre cross section    
  • Archive reading room isometric cutaway section    

Hugh Broughton Architects has created a visitor centre and archive building for the Henry Moore Foundation.

The new archive, with a blockwork and concrete plank structure, contains three BS 5454-compliant controlled-environment spaces, a wood-panelled reading room with views through its metal-louvred east and west facing corner section, and a reception segment connected to the original building. The main body of the new archive is rectangular in plan, and its monopitch roof falls from its south-facing, two storey-high side to meet the flat-roofed link section.

The visitor centre and offices were straightforward in terms of servicing approach, while the archive’s requirements were more specific, as it needed to provide safe storage for Moore’s films, negatives, prints, papers and books. Planning and sustainability considerations determined a pragmatic approach to the design, providing the volumes required within a domestic-scale building. This in turn had an impact on how the environmental strategy was developed. 

Both buildings are provided with heating and chilled water from a centralised ground source heat pump installation in the archive building’s new-build plant areas. This met the planning authority’s stringent carbon emissions requirements, as well as providing an integrated and quiet central plant source. Heating, chilled and potable water and a high-pressure mist fire suppression system are all distributed from the centralised plant installation to serve both buildings. 

The elevations and roof of the monopitch extension are clad in Cor-ten weathering steel, selected to suit the deciduous woodland setting and for its graceful, naturally ageing properties. The Cor-ten panels provide a rainscreen enclosure, which is fixed back to a sealed, weatherproof insulated carrier panel system. The composite system is supported by reinforced block walls and precast concrete roof panels, which provide both thermal mass and a high level of security.

Data

  • Begun: Feb 2015
  • Completed: Mar 2017
  • Floor area: 1,436m2
  • Sector: Arts and culture
  • Total cost: £5.4M
  • Procurement: JCT Standard Building Contract with Quantities 2011
  • Address: Dane Tree House, Perry Green, Perry Green, SG10 6EE, United Kingdom

Professional Team