House in Barnes

Norman-Prahm architects , London, 2021

 

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Rear extension

On entering the house, one is drawn in by the natural daylight falling across the wooden dining table. The solid timber piece sits at the heart of the ground floor like an anchor. Sitting back into a corner of the upholstered banquette, the space has an intimate scale, yet feels open and connected.

The new openings are deliberately cuts in a wall, framed with architraves and painted timber, retaining a sense of room-ness rather than creating a single space. A new cornice, referencing the original plasterwork in the front-room, traces the edges of the ceiling, defining the volume and character of the room.

Looking towards the garden, two roofs with exposed structural timber ceilings can be seen. They tell the story of the new extensions to the original house. Their ceiling’s expressed roof-ness and materiality create a sense of enclosure and comfort. The timbers, like the cornice, define the volume and make explicit the idea of shelter, balancing the qualities of the tall kitchen space.

Below the timber ceiling of the back extension is a small sitting room, looking out into the garden through the glazed sliding doors. Tactile brick flooring continues out to the terrace, blurring the line between inside and outside.

Structurally, the project is simple. The side return roof bridges a gap between the outrigger and the neighbour. At the garden, only two small walls were required to form the extension, built from bricks reclaimed during the demolition. A hidden set of steels enabled the desired opening up and flow between spaces that are so desirable for family living.

Sitting back at the table, the eyes wander to the circular window up high. A portal out beyond the house, capturing tree tops and clouds, giving the distance view - a chance for the eyes to relax.

Annual CO2 data was not provided

Data

  • Begun: Oct 2020
  • Completed: May 2021
  • Floor area: 42m2
  • Total cost: £190,000
  • Funding: Private
  • Tender date: Jul 2020
  • Procurement: JCT minor works
  • Address: London, SW13, United Kingdom

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