Seminar House Pavilion

Takeshi Hayatsu, Simon Jones, Unit 5 Kingston University, Kingston, 2016

 

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A pavilion built by post-graduate students at Kingston University

The pavilion consists of three layers of simple OSB and softwood composite panel construction, containing an intimate informal meeting room inside and a viewing deck with seating for a picnic at the top.

It is dressed with zinc, hand split wooden shingles and charred timber produced by the Unit 5 students in collaboration with Terunobu Fujimori during his residency at Kingston in March 2016.

The cantilevered layers of the pavilion’s structure were inspired by the upturned form of the Takamasa Yoshizaka’s Inter University Seminar House Project in Japan from 1965, which the Unit 5 visited as part of their study trip to Japan in November 2015.

Fujimori labeled Yoshizaka's work as belonging to what he terms the ‘Red School’. The colour red representing blood, characterising the bodily nature of the work as opposed to the more abstract minded ‘White School’ of contemporary Japanese architecture. The work of 'Red School' is raw, tactile, sometimes improvised, sometimes self built. They use elemental, natural materials and their work is considered somewhat ‘odd’ to Western eyes.

Takeshi Hayatsu has been conducting ongoing self-building projects in his architectural teaching, and the pavilion formed a second installment of Dorich House Museum’s five years plan to build temporary structures every summer. The building projects allow students to learn about structure and material, logistics, procurement, legislation, health and safety, and the teamwork.

During the dismantling of the project in Autumn 2016, a bat was found nestling under the shingles. English Nature were called in and the students had an opportunity to have a seminar by the university’s ecologist about the implication of bat legislations and relationship to the planning regulations. The bat is now safely relocated to a new bat house and the pavilion has been moved to a new location, in which it will be reconstructed in summer 2017.

Data

  • Begun: May 2016
  • Completed: Jun 2016
  • Floor area: 9m2
  • Sector: Education
  • Total cost: £2,000
  • Funding: 2000
  • Procurement: self build
  • Address: Dorich House Museum , Kingston University, Kingston, SW15 3RN , United Kingdom

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