Dining Pavilion

Architecture Project (AP), Malta, 2007

 

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Because of its contrasting materials and construction technology, the extension, that is designed like an over-scale porch, does not conflict with the stone walls of the existing house and, together with the canvas canopy 

David Pisani (website)     Download Original

  • Because of its contrasting materials and construction technology, the extension, that is designed like an over-scale porch, does not conflict with the stone walls of the existing house and, together with the canvas canopy    
  • The dining table    
  • The flax and hemp are an unconventional form of shading    
  • Close up of the flax and hemp intertwined    
  • You don    
  • The Dining Pavilion at night    
  • The Dining Pavilion at night    
  • The forms that have been created by French artist Aude Franjou also play on the natural qualities of the material    
  • The forms that have been created by French artist Aude Franjou also play on the natural qualities of the material    
  • The concertina-like glass scheme in action    
  • Site plan    
  • Ground floor plan    
  • Section A-A    
  • Section B-B    
  • Section C-C    
  • Section D-D    
  • Garden elevation (closed louvres)    
  • Folder screen elevation    
  • Detailed elevation    
  • Model of scheme    
  • The flax being twisted around the hemp    
  • Sketch    
  • Plan before renovation    
  • Folded screen detail    

Pavilion-like extension to an eighteenth century house in Malta, with a shading system of flax twisted around hemp, woven onto a steel frame

This elegant dining pavilion attached to a heavily built house uses a unique approach to shading, so necessary in the hot sun of Malta.

A colonnade of steel columns supports a fabric awning, with a concertina-like glass screen to the south and east facades, decorated with ‘trees’ made from flax twisted around hemp, then woven on to a steel framework. Varying the tension of the weaving introduces the desired curvature.

Like trees growing out of the ground and spreading their tentacle-like branches over the glass surfaces of the kitchen walls, this contemporary sculpture creates a dialogue between the garden and the kitchen.

Data

  • Begun: 2005
  • Completed: 2007
  • Sector: House
  • Total cost: £90,000
  • Address: Dining Pavilion, Malta, MT, Malta