Janus Chairs

Ryder Architecture, Northumberland, 2009

 

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Ryder Architecture's three Janus Chairs can be rotated or moved 

Ryder Architecture (website)     Download Original

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  • When facing inward, the seats resemble the closed bud of a flower; when facing away from each other, they are like petals unfurling    
  • The shelter is named after the Roman deity of ends and beginnings, who is often depicted with two faces    
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Three large rotating seats, or 'sculptural shelters' on the bank of Keilder Water in Northumberland

Janus Chairs were created as one of six sculptural shelters at Kielder Water & Forest Park, northern Europe’s largest man-made lake and England’s largest forest

Made from laminated Douglas fir from the Scottish borders, with polished stainless-steel backs, the three one-piece chairs – approximately 3m high and 1m wide – can be rotated or moved around.

Facing inward, they are the closed bud of a flower; rotated outwards they come into full bloom. On approach, and when seen from other positions around the lake, they appear as one sculpture, yet they provide a constantly changing composition depending on their relative positioning.

Data

  • Begun: Jul 2009
  • Completed: Jul 2009
  • Sectors: Landscape design, Public realm
  • Total cost: £52,000
  • Procurement: Traditional
  • Address: Water & Forest Park, Kielder, Northumberland, NE48 1ER, United Kingdom

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