Laban Dance Centre

Herzog and de Meuron, London, 2003

 

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Working with artist Michael Craig-Martin, coloured transparent polycarbonate panels were mounted in front of the glass, serving as a protective sun shield and improving the building's energy efficiency 

Hufton + Crow and Dennis Gilbert     Download Original

  • Working with artist Michael Craig-Martin, coloured transparent polycarbonate panels were mounted in front of the glass, serving as a protective sun shield and improving the building    
  • Looking up the ramp from the main entrance, the auditorium is behind the wall to the left    
  • Looking back towards the main entrance    
  • The Michael Craig-Martin mural along the ramp wall    
  • The cafe near the main entrance, which has views to Deptford Creek    
  • The brightly painted interiors give the building a sense of charisma    
  • The skewed form creates ever changing spaces within the building    
  • One of the numerous dance studios    
  • The Laban Centre at night    
  • Stirling Prize judges inspect the building they would award the 2003 prize to    
  • Stirling Prize judges inspect the building they would award the 2003 prize to    
  • Stirling Prize judges inspect the building they would award the 2003 prize to    
  • The Laban Centre has established itself as a special creative environment and catalyst for local regeneration    
  • Site plan    
  • Ground floor plan    
  • Mezzanine floor plan    
  • Upper floor plan    
  • Section A-A    
  • Section B-B    
  • Some variations on the straightforward cladding scheme - generally comprising a double facade with an outer polycarbonate skin and glazed inner skin    

Dance theatre with 13 studios on the banks of the Thames in Deptford

Most of the 13 dance studios are located on the top floor - no two are identical in size and shape and none is a precise rectangle. Arranged around the perimeter of the building, all the studios benefit from natural light. From outside they are private domains, but there are views into all of them from internal circulation spaces.

The 300-seat dance theatre, a facility Laban previously lacked, forms the concealed heart of the building, the fly-tower does not read externally since it is concealed by the top floor studios.

There are views into the cafe and the exercise and treatment rooms, located along the south side of the building at ground level.

Laban is a big-boned concrete structure, an interior landscape focuses on three broad corridor spaces (or wedges) at top-floor level, accessed by remarkably chunky spiral staircases formed of in-situ concrete and painted black. Each of the wedges is colour-coded using a range of vivid hues selected by artist Michael Craig-Martin.

Data

  • Completed: 2003
  • Floor area: 8,203m2
  • Sector: Arts and culture
  • Total cost: £14.4M
  • Tender date: 2000
  • Procurement: Two-stage JCT98 private without quantities
  • Address: Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, Laban, Creekside, London, SE8 3DZ, United Kingdom

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