Transient Gallery

GRAS
Venice, 2012

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Murdo McDermid     Download Original

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Data

  • Begun: Aug 2012
  • Completed: Sep 2012
  • Floor area: 18m2
  • Sectors: Arts and culture, Public realm
  • Total cost: £2,800
  • Funding: Scottish Government, Creative Scotland, British Council (in kind support), Scotland+Venice
  • Tender date: Aug 2012
  • Procurement: Traditional contract
  • Address: Various Locations, Venice, Italy

Professional Team

Suppliers

The Transient Gallery is a mobile, temporary exhibition space designed to celebrate under-appreciated functional objects which enhance the collective identities of the communities they serve

The Transient Gallery explores the significance of everyday functional objects which create or enhance a sense of collective identity across the communities that use them.

In the context of the Venice Architecture Biennale the gallery focuses attention on the historic well heads located throughout the city, which were for centuries the only source of fresh drinking water in Venice.

Often richly embellished with cultural and political motifs, these were an important meeting point where the Venetian people would exchange stories, gossip and news on a daily basis. With the decommissioning of the well heads this network of social interaction was lost. The project presents these threatened artefacts in a gallery like environment at the heart of the communities they once served. By highlighting them and celebrating their history, the gallery encourages debate among residents and design professionals on the relevance of such shared functional objects in contemporary and future communities.