The Causey

ARCADE Architects
Edinburgh, 2007

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The public explore the past, present and future of the West Crosscauseway space through themes, ideas and aspirations 

Arcade Architects     Download Original

  • The public explore the past, present and future of the West Crosscauseway space through themes, ideas and aspirations    
  • The public explore the past, present and future of the West Crosscauseway space through themes, ideas and aspirations    
  • The view from above shows the context of the festival space    
  • The view from above shows the context of the festival space    
  • Part of the concept was to transform the traffic island into a tropical island    
  • The Causey was open to the public for three days in May 2007    
  • It was dismantled following the festival and entirely recycled    
  • Site layout of turf carpet and ramps    
  • Initial schematic layout    
  • initial sketch image    
  • View of the festival space    
  • View of the festival space    

Data

  • Completed: May 2007
  • Floor area: 840m2
  • Sectors: Public realm, Landscape design
  • Total cost: £16,000
  • Funding: Funding and donations in kind: Isobel Leckie/Shaeron Averbuch/Art in Architecture/Six Cities Design Festival/City of Edinburgh Council (Community Grants Fund)/Communities Scotland/Scottish Centre for Regeneration (New Ideas/Seeing is Believing)
  • Address: West Crosscauseway Association, 1 West Crosscauseway, Edinburgh, EH8 9JW, United Kingdom

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Temporary transformation of the historic Causey in Edinburgh into a festival space

A joyful project anarchically different to the responsible Modernism of the architect's regular work, The Causey was a temporary public space which turned a traffic island into a place for a weekend festival in May 2007.

The project was part of the Six Cities Design Festival, promoting design and creativity in six Scottish cities. The space itself was exuberant – road signs were converted into palm trees, and a garish pink carpet joined the two sides of the square. But this shouldn’t distract from the simple but literate urbanism on display, creating an authentic church square and bringing its more commercial buildings into play.