Tate Gallery St Ives

Evans and Shalev Architects
St Ives, 1993

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Buildings prominent position above the beach 

John Edward Linden (website)     Download Original

  • Buildings prominent position above the beach    
  • Gallery and surrounding context    
  • Exterior facade    
  • Circular gallery and curved balcony     
  • Curved loggia gallery    
  • Curved stair to cafe    
  • Gallery facade, conceived as a set of rooms poised on a cliff face    
  • Interior view of gallery space    
  • Interior view of staircase to top floor    
  • Interior view of the circular gallery    
  • Internal gallery room    
  • Internal view from the resturant    
  • View over the beach from the circular gallery    
  • Site plan    
  • Ground floor plan    
  • First floor plan    
  • Second floor plan    
  • Third floor plan    
  • Long section    
  • Cross sections    
  • Side elevation    
  • Cut away axonometric    
  • Light control sketch    
  • Terrace screen and glazing section    
  • Plans and elevations details    

Data

  • Begun: Jun 1991
  • Completed: Jun 1993
  • Floor area: 1,728m2
  • Sector: Arts and culture
  • Total cost: £2M
  • Procurement: JCT Standard Form 1980 Local Authorities Eddition revised May 1988
  • Address: Porthmeor Beach, St Ives, TR26 1TG, United Kingdom

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Gallery built to exhibit the works by the St Ives School of artists, consisting of sculpture and picture galleries, restaurant and roof terrace

The architects proposed a bold design featuring a circular entrance, which echoes the shape of the gas holder previously sited there. This entrance space, rather like an amphitheatre, allowed for a breathtaking curved gallery above, with views overlooking the Atlantic.

Arranged over four floors, the design echoes the architecture of the town. Each of the spaces in the building is a different shape and a different volume and communicates a different sense of perception as you move through it.

The coastal landscape of the surrounding area was also a great influence on the architects. They stated their wish to create a 'dialogue' between the building and its environs, creating exhibition spaces that reflected the very landscape that had provided the inspiration for much of the artwork displayed on its walls